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This course begins by introducing and critically examining the concepts and theories that underpin the idea of indigeneity. It then discusses some of the most active mining regions of the world, providing key contextual information about Indigenous peoples in common-law countries (Canada, United States, Australia) and Latin American countries (Mexico, Peru, Brazil). It also emphasizes Indigenous experiences with colonization, because these experiences frame the way many Indigenous peoples view mining and development activities today. One of the overarching points we wish to stress at the beginning of this course, and which is reflected throughout, is the incredible diversity of Indigenous peoples—culturally, linguistically, developmentally, and in terms of their aspirations. In some parts of the world, such as the Amazon rainforest, Indigenous peoples might be some of the least advanced civilizations remaining in the world, relying on hunting and gathering to survive and having very little interaction with the outside world. In other parts of the world (such as Canada, the United States, or Australia), Indigenous people actively participate in politics and the community, run businesses, and use modern technology. Indigenous peoples' aspirations vary, too. In some cases, they may aspire to have legal, political, and social space to continue a way of life that they have developed over thousands of years. In other cases, they may aspire to find a way to balance the retention of their cultural uniqueness while also participating in the modern world. The authors of this course are attuned to this fact, even though a survey of contemporary Indigenous peoples' aspirations is not covered in this course. One characteristic that all Indigenous peoples share is a deep connection to their history. Although some people might consider the material we survey in this course to be ancient history, these events and stories form the basis of the relationship between Indigenous and Non-Indigenous peoples. It's important that anyone who might have interactions with Indigenous peoples (particularly in the context of mining) be aware of this. Indigenous Peoples and Mining Series Background The Indigenous Peoples and Mining series was developed to support mining professionals in understanding who Indigenous peoples are, how their rights and interests are recognized in standards and law, and to identify how contemporary mining activities impact Indigenous peoples. All the world's major mining regions are home to Indigenous peoples. As the Indigenous rights movement has gained momentum, the mining sector increasingly finds itself having to navigate challenging issues that arise as a result of exploration and extractive activities on or near Indigenous lands. Exacerbating such engagements is the remarkable speed of these political changes. When most present-day mining professionals were in school, Indigenous rights were not even on the radar. Indeed, even today—speaking especially from a global perspective—Indigenous issues are inadequately covered within the mining schools. To students and practitioners alike, the course series will be of interest to anyone active in mining today. Upon completing the course series, participants will come away with an awareness of how contemporary mining activities fit within a long and dynamic story about Indigenous peoples—their existence, historical subjugation, cultural resiliency, and collective effort to gain recognition as distinct peoples with corresponding rights. Authors Amiel Blajchman Corey Dekker   Duration: 7 Hours Access: 90 Days Category: Environment Level: Introduce Version Date: January 17, 2019 Read More

This course identifies some of the intersection points between mining activities and Indigenous peoples. The course is organized according to the mining life cycle, from mineral exploration through mine development, operations, and ultimately mine closure/reclamation and post-closure. We survey some key activities that take place at each phase of the mining life cycle and identify ways in which these activities could both affect and benefit Indigenous peoples. This course also showcases some practical tools and examples for mining practitioners who work with Indigenous peoples. A significant amount of publicly available information describes the experiences that mining proponents have had in Indigenous engagement (both good and bad) and the course provides an introduction to that material. This course continues on from the companion course, "Indigenous Peoples and Mining 1: Indigeneity Concepts and Context," which examines the complex idea of indigeneity in several active mining regions in the world (Canada, the United States, Australia, Mexico, Peru, and Brazil). An overarching point we wish to stress in both courses is the incredible diversity of Indigenous peoples—culturally, linguistically, developmentally, and in terms of their aspirations. Indigenous Peoples and Mining Series Background The Indigenous Peoples and Mining series was developed to support mining professionals in understanding who Indigenous peoples are, how their rights and interests are recognized in standards and law, and to identify how contemporary mining activities impact Indigenous peoples. All the world's major mining regions are home to Indigenous peoples. As the Indigenous rights movement has gained momentum, the mining sector increasingly finds itself having to navigate challenging issues that arise as a result of exploration and extractive activities on or near Indigenous lands. Exacerbating such engagements is the remarkable speed of these political changes. When most present-day mining professionals were in school, Indigenous rights were not even on the radar. Indeed, even today—speaking especially from a global perspective—Indigenous issues are inadequately covered within the mining schools. To students and practitioners alike, the course series will be of interest to anyone active in mining today. Upon completing the course series, participants will come away with an awareness of how contemporary mining activities fit within a long and dynamic story about Indigenous peoples—their existence, historical subjugation, cultural resiliency, and collective effort to gain recognition as distinct peoples with corresponding rights. Authors Amiel Blajchman Corey Dekker   Duration: 5 Hours Access: 90 Days Category: Environment Level: Introduce Version Date: January 17, 2019   ​Need to train a team? Whether you're looking for a customized training program or developing a team, we have enterprise solutions to fit your needs. Learn More Read More

The overall objective of this course is to assist reclamation engineers, scientists, and managers to obtain environmental permits in a timely fashion. It is also intended to help other people, who may be closely associated with permitting, to understand the permitting process. The course also covers steps that will help a permit holder to maintain continued compliance with the permit's requirements, thus avoiding fines, penalties, and, even worse, cessation orders. The concepts that underlie permitting are universal: the social license to operate, including respect for local judgments, environmental assessments, environmental management systems, and that post-mining land use must comply with local or regional planning guidance. Because of the universality of these concepts and the frequent sharing of permitting rules among mining jurisdictions, this course concentrates on those principles that will assist mine planners to obtain permits in a timely fashion. The course is filled with examples of regulations and helpful guidance from permitting jurisdictions in Canada and the United States, where the permitting process is mature and fully developed. These have been culled from the author's long experience with reclamation and the legal framework that surrounds it. Given the multitude of jurisdictions that grant permits: US States and even some counties, Canadian Provinces, and Australian States, it is not possible to create a recipe for completing individual permit applications. The applicant is advised strongly to meet with the officials in its jurisdiction to learn about their specifics. This course, however, will enable the applicant to understand and respond expertly to these local specifics. Content The course comprises 24 learning sessions, each of 30–60 minutes duration, plus supporting figures, tables, images, references, suggested exercises, and interactive course reviews that confirm achievement of the learning objectives. The total duration of the course is estimated at 16 hours. Authors Lee W. Saperstein   Duration 16 Hours Access 90 Days Category Environment Level Specialize Version Date December 13, 2016   ​Need to train a team? Whether you're looking for a customized training program or developing a team, we have enterprise solutions to fit your needs. Learn More   Read More

El proceso de cianidación para la extracción de oro y plata de la mena se ha empleado desde 1898, cuando se usó por primera vez en Nueva Zelandia y África, y luego en Estados Unidos. Es un proceso muy eficaz, capaz de extraer oro en cantidades inferiores a un 1% de onza a partir de una tonelada de roca con más del 90% de eficacia. Dado que existen riesgos medioambientales, un plan de manejo de cianuro es de vital importancia para una mina en funcionamiento. En algunas ocasiones, al no existir dicho plan, se han producido incidentes relacionados al cianuro que han sido adversos para el medio ambiente. El Programa de las Naciones Unidas para el Medio Ambiente (UNEP) está desarrollando un código internacional para el manejo de cianuro. La implementación y la adherencia a este código, aumentada por el juicio de científicos e ingenieros experimentados, servirá para reducir la cantidad y la gravedad de incidentes relacionados con el cianuro. Los cursos de "Manejo del cianuro en minería" ofrecen al usuario los antecedentes necesarios para el desarrollo de un plan de manejo de cianuro que cumpla con los requerimientos únicos de cada mina en funcionamiento. Los temas que se tratan en esta serie incluyen: "Toxicidad y efectos medioambientales del cianuro" es el cuarto en una serie de seis cursos. Este curso abarca las fuentes y la toxicidad del cianuro; su toxicidad para organismos acuáticos, aves y mamíferos; la toxicidad de compuestos relacionados y desechos mineros; exposición medioambiental y monitoreo. Este curso abarca 13 sesiones, cada una de 30 a 60 minutos de duración, más figuras, tablas y referencias complementarias, además de tres revisiones interactivas que confirman los logros de los objetivos de aprendizaje. 1: Química del cianuro libre y complejado 2: Análisis de cianuros 3: Propiedades geoquímicas y destino medioambiental del cianuro 4: Toxicidad y efectos medioambientales del cianuro 5: Manejo de aguas y estrategias de desecho 6: Tecnologías de tratamiento del cianuro y compuestos relacionados Authors Dr. Terry Mudder Dr. Karen A. Hagelstein   Duration: 12 horas Access: 90 Days Category: Environment Level: Cross Train Version Date: 30 de enero de 2015   ​Need to train a team? Whether you're looking for a customized training program or developing a team, we have enterprise solutions to fit your needs. Learn More   Read More

  El proceso de cianidación para la extracción de oro y plata de la mena se ha empleado desde 1898, cuando se usó por primera vez en Nueva Zelandia y África, y luego en Estados Unidos. Es un proceso muy eficaz, capaz de extraer oro en cantidades inferiores a un 1% de onza a partir de una tonelada de roca con más del 90% de eficacia.Dado que existen riesgos medioambientales, un plan de manejo de cianuro es de vital importancia para una mina en funcionamiento. En algunas ocasiones, al no existir dicho plan, se han producido incidentes relacionados al cianuro que han sido adversos para el medio ambiente. El Programa de las Naciones Unidas para el Medio Ambiente (UNEP) está desarrollando un código internacional para el manejo de cianuro. La implementación y la adherencia a este código, aumentada por el juicio de científicos e ingenieros experimentados, servirá para reducir la cantidad y la gravedad de incidentes relacionados con el cianuro.Los cursos de "Manejo del cianuro en minería" ofrecen al usuario los antecedentes necesarios para el desarrollo de un plan de manejo de cianuro que cumpla con los requerimientos únicos de cada mina en funcionamiento. Los temas que se tratan en esta serie incluyen: 1: Chemistry of Free and Complexed Cyanide 2: Analysis of Cyanides 3: Geochemical Properties and Environmental Fate of Cyanide 4: Toxicity and Environmental Properties of Cyanide 5: Water Management and Discharge Strategies 6: Treatment Technologies for Cyanide and Related Compounds "Estrategias de gestión y descarga de aguas" es el quinto en una serie de seis cursos y abarca los componentes de un plan de gestión de aguas incluido el balance de aguas, manejo de cianuro, prácticas de gestión de aguas y plantas de tratamiento y descarga.Este curso abarca 8 sesiones, cada una de 30 a 60 minutos de duración, más figuras, tablas y referencias complementarias, además de tres revisiones interactivas que confirman los logros de los objetivos de aprendizaje. Authors Dr. Terry Mudder   Duration 6 horas Access 90 Days Category Environment Level Cross Train Version Date 2 de marzo de 2015 ​Need to train a team? Whether you're looking for a customized training program or developing a team, we have enterprise solutions to fit your needs. Learn More Read More

In order to understand the impacts of metals on aquatic ecosystems, it is first important to understand the principles of ecology, what an aquatic ecosystem is, and how metals from all stages in the life of a mine are discharged to these ecosystems. The author then examines the properties of metals and how they enter these ecosystems from mining and other human activities. The author presents the properties and uses of specific metals that are mined, or byproducts of mining, in Canada and other countries, and the toxic effects of these metals on fish, other aquatic organisms, and humans. This is followed by an explanation of various toxicity testing methods, their advantages and disadvantages, and how to prevent and control the generation and discharge of acid rock drainage (ARD). The case studies include mine histories, the toxic metals and/or cyanide that are or were generated and discharged to the aquatic environment, actions taken to prevent and control discharge of these pollutants, and the results of the source control actions. Authors Dr. Frances Solomon   Duration 12 Hours Access 90 Days Category Environment Level Specialize Version Date  March 9, 2017   ​Need to train a team? Whether you're looking for a customized training program or developing a team, we have enterprise solutions to fit your needs. Learn More   Read More

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