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In theory, mine closure is simple; in practice, it is difficult. In this course, we will start with the simple and then proceed to the more difficult, which we will explain in terms that will enable you to deal with the many issues that arise as you plan and implement mine closure. The simple part of mine closure may be set down as three objectives: remove equipment and structures; stabilize waste piles; and control spread of pollutants from the closed site. As we shall see as we progress through this course, these three simple objectives quickly give rise to many questions and knotty issues, including: Who pays? Who says enough is enough? And, What is to become of the site in the long term? Many more related and difficult issues arise. Reading only this course will not enable you to solve all the problems. Each mine site is unique and demands a unique closure plan and approach. You will undoubtedly have to formulate the specifics of the closure plan for your mine by way of many studies, meetings, reports, and deep deliberations. This course will attempt to set down the current state of ideas, practice, and possibilities, so that you are empowered to move forward to success at the mine where you are part of a team charged with mine closure. Author Jack A. Caldwell Duration 15 Access 90 days Category Environment Level Cross Train Version May 11, 2011   ​Need to train a team? Whether you're looking for a customized training program or developing a team, we have enterprise solutions to fit your needs. Learn More     Read More

Practical Ore Microscopy and Mineralography is concerned particularly with information obtained from reflected light microscopy of opaque minerals. A review of the mineralographic microscope is provided at the outset, however familiarity with both the petrographic (transmitted light) and mineralographic (reflected light) microscope is a basic premise of the course. Segments of the course that follow are each more-or-less stand-alone. The course places considerable emphasis on the identification, description and classification of textures because of the enormous practical implications of ore textures to mineral beneficiation and ore genesis. Specific topics such as paragenesis, exsolution and sulfide metamorphism and sulfide phase equilibria will be of concern to those with specific interests. A variety of practical concepts related to ore microscopy (liberation, modal analysis, textural case histories, reconciling mineral proportions and assays) are discussed that pertain particularly to mineral beneficiation. Finally, a series of exercises are described that relate to information obtained from ore microscopy studies. These exercises involve topics such as: sampling of particulate ore material, changing volume percent to weight percent (and vice versa), point count and grain counting, calculating mineral formula from chemical analysis, regression as a means of determining precious metal hosts in an ore, mass balance procedures involving modal (volume) percentages of minerals and assays of metals. Authors Alastair J. Sinclair   Duration 12 Hours Access 90 Days Category Environment Level Specialize Version Date August 15, 2003   ​Need to train a team? Whether you're looking for a customized training program or developing a team, we have enterprise solutions to fit your needs. Learn More     Read More

This course is developed under a collaborative agreement with the Learning Strategies Group, a division of Simon Fraser University Business. It is one of a series of courses on business administration applications in mining. Understanding and managing the interactions along the interface between business, community, and government is becoming an increasingly critical component of managerial competency and organizational success. The focus of the course will be to highlight the nature and dynamics of these interactions among multiple players with different goals and concerns—corporations, communities, First Nations, interest groups, unions, governments—and the development of perspectives, tools, and strategies that today's leaders and managers can put to use on the ground and in the boardroom. Examples of the topics covered include: Understanding responsibility and relationships; Recognizing power and values; Turning differences into assets; Creating clear expectations as a foundation for effective working relationships; Developing the capacity to anticipate issues and putting in place proactive structures to deal with disputes when they arise; Recognizing and valuing relationships as assets; How and when to use negotiation and consensus building appropriately and effectively both within the organizations and with external interests and stakeholders; Creating sustainable outcomes through sustainable relationships. Authors Glenn Sigurdson QC   Duration: 8 Hours Access: 90 Days Category: Environment Level: Specialize Version Date: May 13, 2007 ​Need to train a team? Whether you're looking for a customized training program or developing a team, we have enterprise solutions to fit your needs. Learn More Read More

Reclamation and Revegetation for Mines in Arid Climates is intended for environmental specialists in private practice and governmental agencies. The purpose of this course is to present mining related reclamation based on practical and actual experience. The course presents actual mine reclamation practices that worked or didn’t work. The focus of this course is on base and precious metal mining operations in the western US, but the reclamation practices are applicable in other regions of the US and abroad. The course presents all aspects related to reclamation of mines from the initial baseline studies to final reclamation and bond release. Much of the approach is based on requirements by governmental agency rules and regulations. Reclamation programs are based on site specific conditions and baseline studies. These studies and surveys may start by examining natural revegetation in the region and on old mine disturbance. The goal is to create systems based on ecosystem analysis (prior knowledge) and sound ecological processes and patterns. The ecosystems established will be stable and sustainable based on the environmental settings, since local ecosystems are a function of climate, soils, biota; animals/vegetation, time, cycles, and energy flow. The goal is to match current ecosystems and promote diversity in compatibility with the surrounding landscape. Authors Dr. Sam Bamberg   Duration 12 Hours Access 90 Days Category Environment Level Specialize Version Date March 13, 2013 ​Need to train a team? Whether you're looking for a customized training program or developing a team, we have enterprise solutions to fit your needs. Learn More Read More

This course is intended for a broad-based audience of managers, professionals, students and concerned stakeholders in mining who require an understanding of the concepts and issues of sustainable development. Sustainable Development in Mining focuses on the underlying concepts and issues that apply specifically to the mining industry. Included are the sustainable development concepts of... economic growth that preserves the earth's biophysical integrity; optimization of the societal benefits of economic development; system quality... which systems should be preserved/improved; a more equitable distribution of the benefits and burdens of economic growth ... both within the present generation and between present and future generations; greater public participation in the decision-making process. These concepts are illustrated by numerous case studies and examples from mining projects, and further supported by a discussion of mineral consumption, recycling and resource depletion. Authors Marcello Veiga Stephen Roberts   Duration: 14 Hours Access: 90 Days Category: Environment Level: Cross Train Version Date: October 10, 2005   ​Need to train a team? Whether you're looking for a customized training program or developing a team, we have enterprise solutions to fit your needs. Learn More Read More

Regardless of world market conditions, to win, sustain, and maintain the right to mine is all about sustainability. Waste water management is emerging as the pre-eminent sustainability issue within the global energy and mining resource industries, i.e. related to the following activities: coal bed methane water (CBMw), LNG waste water, oil shale water, coal mining, open pit and underground mining, natural gas extraction, hydrocarbons, metallurgical ore processing, surface and underground earthworks and drainage, and underground coal gasification. This waste water management course has been designed to educate people from the mining, metallurgical, oil, and gas sectors who have to manage waste water issues associated with their day to day activities. This course will equip them with a basic knowledge and understanding of water management tools and strategies, including knowledge of the common terms associated with the water treatment industry. The course does not replace professional advice; however, it does allow informed discussions with professionals. Traditionally, waste water management is encountered in most energy resource extraction, mining, and ore processing activities. All of these industries are facing increasing scrutiny, regulation, competition for land access, and "angst" from local landholders (farmers) and stakeholders (agricultural and urban development). These crucial stakeholders have the perception of their water resource being potentially polluted, and/or reduced in available volume by the resource industry unless proved otherwise. They are concerned about sustainability, potential pollution issues, and access to the water resource itself. Water is the principal vehicle by which potential pollutants in untreated wastewater can be carried from these industries to local habitats potentially impacting on the local surface areas, the local environment, and underground aquifers—especially where this water is accessed and applied through traditional practices such as irrigation. In extreme cases, the polluted water could impact on human life itself. So, in order to demonstrate responsible stewardship over the water resource being extracted, this course gives a practical framework in order to create a robust sustainable water management solution (plan) that has the components of assessing the: raw waste water quality; final stage target water quality; potential beneficial uses for the water; treatment options to achieve the targets outlined above; and a risk assessment process that avoids harm to the environment while realising long-term sustainable benefits. Author Ralph Gunness   Duration 9 Hours Access 90 Days Category Environment Level Specialize Version Date August 16, 2016   ​Need to train a team? Whether you're looking for a customized training program or developing a team, we have enterprise solutions to fit your needs. Learn More Read More

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