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The cyanidation process for the extraction of gold and silver from ore has been employed since 1898 when it was first used in New Zealand and Africa and soon after in the United States. It is a very efficient process capable of extracting gold in amounts of less than one percent of an ounce from a ton of rock with over 90% efficiency. Because of the environmental risks, a cyanide management plan is of critical importance to a mining operation. The lack of such a plan, in some cases, has contributed to adverse environmental incidents involving cyanide. The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) is developing an international code for the management of cyanide. Implementation and adherence to this code, augmented by experienced scientific and engineering judgment, will help reduce both the number and severity of environmental incidents involving cyanide. The "Cyanide Management in Mining" courses attempt to provide the user with the necessary background for development of a cyanide management plan that meets the unique requirements of each operating mine. The full complement of courses in the series includes: Chemistry of Free and Complexed Cyanide Analysis of Cyanides Geochemical Properties and Environmental Fate of Cyanide Toxicity and Environmental Properties of Cyanide Water Management and Discharge Strategies Treatment Technologies for Cyanide and Related Compounds "Geochemical Properties and Environmental Fate of Cyanide" is the third in the series of six courses. This course covers the attenuation mechanisms applicable to cyanide and their effectiveness in different metallurgical and environmental contexts, including surface ponds, tailings, heap leach, soil and groundwater. This course comprises 12 viewing sessions, each of 30 - 60 minutes duration, plus supporting figures, tables and references, and three interactive reviews that confirm achievement of the learning objectives. Authors Dr. Terry Mudder   Duration 10 Hours Access 90 Days Category Environmental Level Specialize Published August 3, 2006 Updated October 13, 2021   ​Need to train a team? Whether you're looking for a customized training program or developing a team, we have enterprise solutions to fit your needs. Learn More Read More

The cyanidation process for the extraction of gold and silver from ore has been employed since 1898 when it was first used in New Zealand and Africa and soon after in the United States. It is a very efficient process capable of extracting gold in amounts of less than one percent of an ounce from a ton of rock with over 90% efficiency. Because of the environmental risks, a cyanide management plan is of critical importance to a mining operation. The lack of such a plan, in some cases, has contributed to adverse environmental incidents involving cyanide. The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) is developing an international code for the management of cyanide. Implementation and adherence to this code, augmented by experienced scientific and engineering judgment, will help reduce both the number and severity of environmental incidents involving cyanide. The "Cyanide Management in Mining" courses attempt to provide the user with the necessary background for development of a cyanide management plan that meets the unique requirements of each operating mine. The full complement of courses in the series includes: Chemistry of Free and Complexed Cyanide Analysis of Cyanides Geochemical Properties and Environmental Fate of Cyanide Toxicity and Environmental Properties of Cyanide Water Management and Discharge Strategies Treatment Technologies for Cyanide and Related Compounds "Analysis of Cyanides" is the second in the series of six courses. This course covers the methods available for measurement and analysis of different categories of cyanide, and discusses the advantages, disadvantages and problems associated with them. It also covers sources of analytical interference in cyanide analysis, variability and accuracy, and measurement of low levels of cyanide in the environment. This course comprises 10 viewing sessions, each of 30 - 60 minutes duration, plus supporting figures, tables and references, and two interactive reviews that confirm achievement of the learning objectives Authors Dr. Terry Mudder Duration 8 Hours Access 90 Days Category Environment Level Specialize Published July 10, 2006 Updated July 23, 2021 ​Need to train a team? Whether you're looking for a customized training program or developing a team, we have enterprise solutions to fit your needs. Learn More Read More

This is the first course in the six-course Cyanide Management in Mining series. This course assumes knowledge of environmental engineering or mineral processing. The chemistry of cyanide solutions is unique with its ability to dissolve gold and silver. Cyanide is highly selective with respect to combining with gold and silver; in solution it forms complexes with other metals, such as mercury, zinc, copper, iron, and nickel. The formation of these other metal complexes partially account for the consumption of cyanide in gold extraction circuits and generate solutions that can be difficult to treat and analyze. Although chemical replacements for cyanide have been investigated for decades, it remains the exclusive extraction reagent or lixiviant of choice for over 90% of the gold recovered. This is due to a combination of availability, effectiveness, economics, and an ability to use and manage cyanide with acceptable risk to humans and the environment. Cyanide Management in Mining Series The Cyanide Management in Mining course series provides the learner with the necessary background for developing a cyanide management plan that meets the unique requirements of each operating mine. Due to environmental risks, a cyanide management plan is of critical importance to a mining operation. The lack of such a plan, in some cases, has contributed to adverse environmental incidents involving cyanide. The series consists of the following courses. Chemistry of Free and Complexed Cyanide Analysis of Cyanides Geochemical Properties and Environmental Fate of Cyanide Toxicity and Environmental Properties of Cyanide Water Management and Discharge Strategies Treatment Technologies for Cyanide and Related Compounds Authors Dr. Terry Mudder Duration 3 Hours Access 90 Days Category Environment Level Specialize Published: August 17, 2018 Updated: July 19, 2021 ​Need to train a team? Whether you're looking for a customized training program or developing a team, we have enterprise solutions to fit your needs. Learn More Read More

Regardless of world market conditions, to win, sustain, and maintain the right to mine is all about sustainability. Waste water management is emerging as the pre-eminent sustainability issue within the global energy and mining resource industries, i.e. related to the following activities: coal bed methane water (CBMw), LNG waste water, oil shale water, coal mining, open pit and underground mining, natural gas extraction, hydrocarbons, metallurgical ore processing, surface and underground earthworks and drainage, and underground coal gasification. This waste water management course has been designed to educate people from the mining, metallurgical, oil, and gas sectors who have to manage waste water issues associated with their day to day activities. This course will equip them with a basic knowledge and understanding of water management tools and strategies, including knowledge of the common terms associated with the water treatment industry. The course does not replace professional advice; however, it does allow informed discussions with professionals. Traditionally, waste water management is encountered in most energy resource extraction, mining, and ore processing activities. All of these industries are facing increasing scrutiny, regulation, competition for land access, and "angst" from local landholders (farmers) and stakeholders (agricultural and urban development). These crucial stakeholders have the perception of their water resource being potentially polluted, and/or reduced in available volume by the resource industry unless proved otherwise. They are concerned about sustainability, potential pollution issues, and access to the water resource itself. Water is the principal vehicle by which potential pollutants in untreated wastewater can be carried from these industries to local habitats potentially impacting on the local surface areas, the local environment, and underground aquifers—especially where this water is accessed and applied through traditional practices such as irrigation. In extreme cases, the polluted water could impact on human life itself. So, in order to demonstrate responsible stewardship over the water resource being extracted, this course gives a practical framework in order to create a robust sustainable water management solution (plan) that has the components of assessing the: raw waste water quality; final stage target water quality; potential beneficial uses for the water; treatment options to achieve the targets outlined above; and a risk assessment process that avoids harm to the environment while realising long-term sustainable benefits. Author Ralph Gunness   Duration 9 Hours Access 90 Days Category Environment Level Specialize Version Date August 16, 2016   ​Need to train a team? Whether you're looking for a customized training program or developing a team, we have enterprise solutions to fit your needs. Learn More Read More

This course discusses the principles and practice of surface water management at mines. It describes best management practices for surface water management at a mine in order to achieve the following objectives. Control surface water in order to prevent pollution of on-site and off-site water resources. Divert excess runoff that may otherwise flood or interfere with mine workings. Limit infiltration to mine waste disposal facilities to control potential pollution of surface water and underground waters resulting from excessive infiltration. Control erosion of the site to limit sediment runoff that may negatively affect receiving waters. Control erosion that may otherwise cause excessive damage to mine closure works. Objectives All mines disturb the surface. All mines change the features of the mine site that affect precipitation runoff, evaporation, streamflow, and erosion. All mines involve grading of the site, diversion of runoff, and placement of wastes that increase or decrease infiltration of surface water to the groundwater. Inevitably at a mine it is necessary to capture and control sediments and other pollutants in surface water, and build and operate the works needed to comply with regulations regarding off-site impact by surface waters running from the mine. Accordingly, this course is intended for all those people at a mine or associated with a mine who may be involved with or responsible for the hydrologic, hydraulic, environmental, civil, and mining engineering works required to manage surface water at a mine. Author Jack Caldwell P.E., MS.(Eng.), LLB   Duration 12 Hours Access 90 Days Category Geotechnics Level Specialize Version Date February 22, 2013 Need to train a team? Whether you're looking for a customized training program or developing a team, we have enterprise solutions to fit your needs. Learn More Read More

Covers are constructed at mines sites over facilities such as tailings impoundments, heap leach pads, waste rock dumps, sludge ponds, and solid waste disposal units. Generally the cover is constructed as part of the closure and/or reclamation works. A wide range of cover types have been designed and constructed on mine facilities worldwide, from water covers, through soil covers, geosynthetic covers, and waste rock covers. The specifics of the cover are dictated by the: type of waste covered; materials available to construct the cover; environment of the mine; and governing regulations. This course is the first in a series of two courses on covers for mine geowaste facilities. Covers for Mine Geowaste Facilities - 1: Principles, Practice, and Selection deals with the general principles and practice of covers—what their purpose is, what objectives govern their selection and detailing, and what to consider when choosing a cover for your specific facility. In this course, we examine the: objectives of mine closure—the activity that most frequently gives rise to the need for a cover; purpose of the cover, and hence the criteria which govern the design, construction, and ultimately the performance of the cover; and layers or components of a cover—some to limit infiltration, some to resist erosion, and some to support vegetation. The course includes numerous case studies from the author's extensive experience. It also includes descriptions of many types of covers that have been used and that could be used at mines. This course is intended for all who seek to know more about covers for mines and their waste management facilities. There is information in this course for those charged with choosing a cover type, designing and constructing the cover, paying for the cover, and for those regulating and permitting a new cover. There is also information in this course for those who may be evaluating and judging a mine's closure plan, which normally includes one or more covers. Topics in include design analyses, performance assessment, cover construction, and surveillance and maintenance. include design analyses, performance assessment, cover construction, and surveillance and maintenance. Authors Jack Caldwell P.E., MS.(Eng.), LLB Duration 12 hours Access 90 Days Category Geotechnics Level Specialize Version Date October 26, 2016   ​Need to train a team? Whether you're looking for a customized training program or developing a team, we have enterprise solutions to fit your needs. Learn More Read More

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