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Most mining project investments are comprised of three factors: the investment is partially or completely irreversible with significant exit costs; there is uncertainty over the future returns from the investment; the investor has some latitude relating to the timing of the investment. These three factors interact to determine the optimal decisions in mining project investments. There are of a lot of unknown variables at the outset of a mining project. When the mining project is in operation, there is no crystal ball to tell exactly when the mining project will reach its maximum value. Consequently, in any mining project evaluation, there are no clear answers for the questions below. How much will the minimum initial capital cost be? How much will the maximum mine value be? How long will the optimum mine life be? This course shows you how to arrive at these essential decisions, by addressing the unknown variables with the best assumptions that can be made based on the information that is available. Authors Micah Nehring Shahriar Shafiee   Duration: 15 Hours Access: 90 Days Category: Financial Level: Specialize Version Date: March 17, 2014   ​Need to train a team? Whether you're looking for a customized training program or developing a team, we have enterprise solutions to fit your needs. Learn More Read More

The overall objective of this course is to assist reclamation engineers, scientists, and managers to obtain environmental permits in a timely fashion. It is also intended to help other people, who may be closely associated with permitting, to understand the permitting process. The course also covers steps that will help a permit holder to maintain continued compliance with the permit's requirements, thus avoiding fines, penalties, and, even worse, cessation orders. The concepts that underlie permitting are universal: the social license to operate, including respect for local judgments, environmental assessments, environmental management systems, and that post-mining land use must comply with local or regional planning guidance. Because of the universality of these concepts and the frequent sharing of permitting rules among mining jurisdictions, this course concentrates on those principles that will assist mine planners to obtain permits in a timely fashion. The course is filled with examples of regulations and helpful guidance from permitting jurisdictions in Canada and the United States, where the permitting process is mature and fully developed. These have been culled from the author's long experience with reclamation and the legal framework that surrounds it. Given the multitude of jurisdictions that grant permits: US States and even some counties, Canadian Provinces, and Australian States, it is not possible to create a recipe for completing individual permit applications. The applicant is advised strongly to meet with the officials in its jurisdiction to learn about their specifics. This course, however, will enable the applicant to understand and respond expertly to these local specifics. Content The course comprises 24 learning sessions, each of 30–60 minutes duration, plus supporting figures, tables, images, references, suggested exercises, and interactive course reviews that confirm achievement of the learning objectives. The total duration of the course is estimated at 16 hours. Authors Lee W. Saperstein   Duration 16 Hours Access 90 Days Category Environment Level Specialize Version Date December 13, 2016   ​Need to train a team? Whether you're looking for a customized training program or developing a team, we have enterprise solutions to fit your needs. Learn More   Read More

This course is intended for professional engineers and geoscientists concerned with mineral project reporting for an issuer on a Canadian stock exchange. It is also a reference source of mineral project reporting standards for property owners, securities analysts, and regulators. The course provides guidance for the preparation of a technical report under National Instrument 43-101—Standards of Disclosure for Mineral Projects, Form 43-101 F1—Technical Report, and Companion Policy 43-101 CP (NI 43-101). NI 43-101 establishes the standards for all public disclosure of scientific and technical information about a mineral project. NI 43-101 became effective on February 1, 2001 and is a law applicable across Canada. It requires that all disclosure be based on advice provided by a "qualified person" and in some circumstances that the person be independent of the issuer and the property. NI 43-101 also requires that issuers file technical reports at specific times and in a prescribed format. This course has been revised to the version of National Instrument 43-101 published April 8, 2011, which became effective law in Canada on June 30, 2011. The course also considers all amendments to National Instrument 43-101 Standards of Disclosure for Mineral Projects up until May 9, 2016. This is a premium course which has been peer-reviewed by a committee appointed by the Canadian Institute of Mining, Metallurgy and Petroleum (CIM) and the Society for Mining, Metallurgy and Exploration (SME). Authors Reno Pressacco   Duration: 8 Hours Access: 90 Days Category: Exploration Level: Specialize Version Date: May 1, 2018 ​Need to train a team? Whether you're looking for a customized training program or developing a team, we have enterprise solutions to fit your needs. Learn More   Read More

Practical Geostatistics 2000 - 1: Classical Statistics is the first of a set of two courses. The companion course is Practical Geostatistics 2000 - 2: Spatial Statistics. These courses are based on over 40 years of teaching statistics and geostatistics to mining engineers, geologists, hydrologists, soil scientists, climatologists, plus the occasional geographer, pattern recognition expert, meteorologist, statistician, and computer scientist. Even, on one occasion, an accountant. Over those years, we have endeavoured to pare away all extraneous mathematics and concentrate on intuitive derivations where possible. Readers interested in rigorous mathematical proofs are urged to stop here and turn to the more theoretically based material (a comprehensive bibliography is included). This course is not intended to turn out fully-fledged geostatisticians. It is intended for people with problems to be solved which can be assisted by a geostatistical approach. To benefit from this course you need to be fairly comfortable with basic algebra. That is, with the notion of using symbols as shorthand for longer statements. We have worked hard to bring you consistent notation throughout the course. Where notation is out of our control, we explain carefully what each symbol stands for and try not to use that symbol for anything else. Calculus—differentiation and integration—is discussed at various points in the text. The reader is not expected to do any calculus (as such) but is expected to know that the differential of x squared is 2x. The only other complication is the frequent use of simultaneous equations. We tend not to use matrix algebra in this course but will give the matrix form after explanations have been given in simple algebra. For example, linear regression is easier to understand if developed with algebra, but very simple to implement in spreadsheets if matrices are used. If we haven't scared you off yet, be reassured by the fact that all the analyses are illustrated with real data sets in full worked examples. Data sets and software can be downloaded from Ecosse Geostatistics. There are also exercises for you to try. Answers are available for you to check your results. Most of these exercises have been collected and used in classes or examinations at Final (Senior) Year and Master's levels. It is our own fundamental regret that this course cannot contain the jokes, anecdotes and sheer fun that we have giving the course in person. We do advise you, however, to keep your sense of humour and common sense at all times while taking this course.The principal topics covered by this course include... Why a Statistical Approach? The Normal (Gaussian) Distribution The Lognormal Distribution (and Variants) Discrete Statistics Testing Hypotheses Relationships The course comprises 24 viewing sessions, each of approximately 60 minutes duration, plus supporting figures, tables, worked examples, references and appendices, and interactive reviews that confirm your achievement of the learning objectives.The above picture is attributed to USACE HQ. This is a premium course which has been peer-reviewed by a committee appointed by the Canadian Institute of Mining, Metallurgy and Petroleum (CIM) and the Society for Mining, Metallurgy and Exploration (SME). Authors Isobel Clark William Harper   Duration: 25 Hours Access:  90 Days Category: Exploration Level: Exploration Version Date: January 27, 2014   ​Need to train a team? Whether you're looking for a customized training program or developing a team, we have enterprise solutions to fit your needs. Learn More Read More

Practical Geostatistics 2000 - 2: Spatial Statistics is the second of a set of two courses. The companion course is Practical Geostatistics 2000 - 1: Classical Statistics.These courses are based on 40 years of teaching to mining engineers, geologists, hydrologists, soil scientists, climatologists, plus the occasional geographer, pattern recognition expert, meteorologist, statistician, and computer scientist. Even, on one occasion, an accountant. Over those years, we have endeavoured to pare away all extraneous mathematics and concentrate on intuitive derivations where possible.Readers interested in rigorous mathematical proofs are urged to stop here and turn to the more theoretically based material (a comprehensive bibliography is included). This course is not intended to turn out fully-fledged geostatisticians. It is intended for people with problems to be solved which can be assisted by a geostatistical approach.To benefit from this course you need to be fairly comfortable with basic algebra. That is, with the notion of using symbols as shorthand for longer statements. We have worked hard to bring you consistent notation throughout the course. Where notation is out of our control, we explain carefully what each symbol stands for and try not to use that symbol for anything else.Calculus—differentiation and integration—is discussed at various points in the text. The reader is not expected to do any calculus (as such) but is expected to know that the differential of × squared is 2×. The only other complication is the frequent use of simultaneous equations. We tend not to use matrix algebra in this course but will give the matrix form after explanations have been given in simple algebra. For example, linear regression is easier to understand if developed with algebra, but very simple to implement in spreadsheets if matrices are used.If we haven't scared you off yet, be reassured by the fact that all the analyses are illustrated with real data sets in full worked examples. Data sets and software can be downloaded from Ecosse Geostatistics. There are also exercises for you to try. Answers are available for you to check your results. Most of these exercises have been collected and used in classes or examinations at Final (Senior) Year and Master's levels.It is our own fundamental regret that this course cannot contain the jokes, anecdotes and sheer fun that we have giving the course in person. We do advise you, however, to keep your sense of humour and common sense at all times while taking this course.The principal topics covered by this course include... Spatial Relationships The Semi-Variogram Estimation and Kriging Areas and Volumes Other Kriging Approaches The course comprises 17 viewing sessions, each of approximately 60 minutes duration, plus supporting figures, tables, worked examples, references and appendices, and interactive reviews that confirm your achievement of the learning objectives. Authors Isobel Clark William Harper   Duration: 10 Hours Access: 90 Days Category: Exploration Level: Professional Version Date: April 15, 2014         ​Need to train a team? Whether you're looking for a customized training program or developing a team, we have enterprise solutions to fit your needs. Learn More Read More

In recent years there has been a strong international move toward knowing and improving the quality of information used in the mining industry for mineral project exploration reporting and resource/reserve estimation. In Canada this trend has been accentuated because of recent, highly publicized scams that involved contamination of samples. An important aim of quality control procedures is to minimize the likelihood of such scams so that the public is not misled as to the economic potential of a mineral deposit. Quality control procedures also serve the technical purposes of identifying sources of and quantifying both random errors and unintentional bias in sampling, subsampling and analytical routines and thus provide the basis for improved procedures of data collection that translate into improved resource/reserve estimates. One of the important reactions in Canada to recent mining scams has been the implementation of what is known as National Instrument 43-101 (NI43-101) in which a wide range of requirements, relating to mineral project reporting and resource/reserve estimation, are laid out. These requirements identify a Qualified Person (QP) who is responsible for all technical matters related to obtaining and publicizing both assay data and resource/reserve figures. This course incorporates a variety of procedures designed to fulfill the requirements of NI43-101 insofar as standard, blank and duplicate samples can be used to define and monitor quality of geochemical and assay values that are the basis of deposit evaluation. The International Standards Organization (ISO) has developed a variety of widely distributed publications dealing with quality control systems for a wide range of industrial settings. The application of the ISO standards to resource/reserve estimation procedures necessarily involves all steps of the published procedures. Too often quality control is thought of only in terms of quantitative measurements. A broader perspective is essential and must include the categorical and qualitative data that are inherent in geological studies. This is a premium course which has been peer-reviewed by a committee appointed by the Canadian Institute of Mining, Metallurgy and Petroleum (CIM) and the Society for Mining, Metallurgy and Exploration (SME). Authors Alastair J. Sinclair   Duration: 25 Hours Access: 90 Days Category: Exploration Level: Cross Train Original Publish Date: June 3, 2015 Revised Date:  October 6, 2021 Need to train a team? Whether you're looking for a customized training program or developing a team, we have enterprise solutions to fit your needs. Learn More Read More

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