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In this course, we discuss the water and chemical mass balance of a mine site and the many components or facilities that go to make up a mine. There are as many water and chemical mass balances as there are mines. And there are as many mass balances as there are facilities on a mine. In this course we focus on the fundamental theories and methods and illustrate these with examples that are intended to assist and guide in compiling water and chemical mass balances for a mine and its various facilities. This course is one of a series of related courses, others in the series include: Groundwater in Mining Surface Water Management at Mines Objectives Reasons for undertaking a facility or site water balance study may include: evaluating strategies for optimum use of limited water supplies; establishing procedures for limiting site discharge and complying with discharge requirements; estimating the demands on water treatment plants, holding ponds, evaporation ponds, or wetlands. Authors Jack Caldwell P.E., MS.(Eng.), LLB   Duration 14 Hours Access 90 Days Category Geotechnics Level Specialize Version Date  December 19, 2013   ​Need to train a team? Whether you're looking for a customized training program or developing a team, we have enterprise solutions to fit your needs. Learn More   Read More

Mining involves the design, construction, operation, and closure of many geotechnical structures, including: access roads, structural building pads and foundations, ponds, tailings facilities, heap leach pads, and waste rock dumps. Geosynthetics are polymeric materials used extensively in mine geotechnical structures to enhance the performance of such structures. Geosynthetics are used in conjunction with soils and rocks to increase the overall strength of these materials, to control seepage from mine wastes and through soils and rocks, and to separate soils of different gradation and hence to limit piping and potential failure of soil structures. This course introduces you to the types of geosynthetics used in mine structures, to the ways in which geosynthetics may be used to build safe mine structures, and to the many details that will make it possible for you to use geosynthetics at your mine to reduce costs and protect the environment. This course describes many case histories of the successful use of geosynthetics in mining, thereby introducing concepts, ideas, details, and practical applications that you may copy or adapt to the specifics of your mine's needs and facilities. Authors Jack Caldwell Colleen Crystal Tarik Hadj-Hamou   Duration: 9 Hours Access: 90 Days Category: Geotechnics Level: Specialize Version Date: September 3, 2014   ​Need to train a team? Whether you're looking for a customized training program or developing a team, we have enterprise solutions to fit your needs. Learn More Read More

Covers are constructed at mines sites over facilities such as tailings impoundments, heap leach pads, waste rock dumps, sludge ponds, and solid waste disposal units. Generally the cover is constructed as part of the closure and/or reclamation works. This course is the second in a series of two courses on covers for mine geowaste facilities. In this course, we examine the design and performance assessment of covers, which includes: engineering, scientific, and technical design methods to calculate and quantify just how the cover may perform in regards to stability, infiltration, erosion, and deformation; and the construction, surveillance, and monitoring that will need to be undertaken to put and keep the cover in operation. The course includes numerous case studies from the author's extensive experience. This course is intended for all who seek to know more about covers for mines and their waste management facilities. There is information in this course for those charged with choosing a cover type, designing and constructing the cover, paying for the cover, and for those regulating and permitting a new cover. There is also information in this course for those who may be evaluating and judging a mine's closure plan, which normally includes one or more covers. Authors Jack Caldwell P.E., MS.(Eng.), LLB Duration 10 hours Access 90 Days Category Geotechnics Level Specialize Version Date October 20, 2016   ​Need to train a team? Whether you're looking for a customized training program or developing a team, we have enterprise solutions to fit your needs. Learn More Read More

This course covers set-up of a numerical model, model calibration and verification, modelling predictions, and evaluation of model uncertainty. Duration: 7 Hours Access: 90 Days Category: Geotechnics Level: Specialize   ​Need to train a team? Whether you're looking for a customized training program or developing a team, we have enterprise solutions to fit your needs. Learn More   Authors Christoph Wels Dan Mackie Jacek Scibek Lawrence Charlebois Paul Ferguson Introduction The scale and nature of mining projects may result in impacts to the receiving environment, including groundwater resources. These impacts need to be quantified before undertaking the project and throughout the mining lifecycle to ensure regulatory compliance, project sustainability, and environmental protection. Common groundwater impacts associated with mining projects may include: aquifer drawdown and/or reduction in groundwater flow due to pumping from groundwater production wells and/or dewatering of open pit/underground workings;loss of groundwater discharge to surface water such as springs, lakes or streams (of particular significance during winter baseflow conditions) due to aquifer drawdown/dewatering related to mining activities;seepage and associated contaminant transport from mine waste units such as waste rock piles, heap leach piles, tailings storage facilities, backfilled and/or flooded pits/underground workings; andoff-site migration of contaminant plumes in groundwater aquifers (originating from mine waste units) and potential discharge of contaminants into the receiving surface water (springs, lakes or streams). The use of numerical groundwater models enables decision makers to study and evaluate potential impacts of large and complex mining projects. Sophisticated models and modelling platforms are, however, no guarantee of good modelling practice. The complexities of groundwater models used for impact assessment may even lead to misuse and/or misinterpretation. This series of two courses on groundwater modelling describes the broader concepts of groundwater modelling related to impact assessment for mining projects. Yet, these guidelines reflect generally accepted best practices in groundwater modelling and as such should be applicable to a wide range of groundwater modelling applications. This groundwater modeling series is based on the British Columbia Groundwater Modelling Guidelines which were commissioned by the British Columbia Ministry of Environment (BC MoE). This course has been modified and condensed to suit the format and (international) audience of an Edumine course. The course comprises ten learning sessions of 30 to 60 minutes each, several case studies, and interactive reviews that confirm achievement of the learning objectives. The total duration of the course is approximately seven hours. Read More

This course discusses the principles and practice of surface water management at mines. It describes best management practices for surface water management at a mine in order to achieve the following objectives. Control surface water in order to prevent pollution of on-site and off-site water resources. Divert excess runoff that may otherwise flood or interfere with mine workings. Limit infiltration to mine waste disposal facilities to control potential pollution of surface water and underground waters resulting from excessive infiltration. Control erosion of the site to limit sediment runoff that may negatively affect receiving waters. Control erosion that may otherwise cause excessive damage to mine closure works. Objectives All mines disturb the surface. All mines change the features of the mine site that affect precipitation runoff, evaporation, streamflow, and erosion. All mines involve grading of the site, diversion of runoff, and placement of wastes that increase or decrease infiltration of surface water to the groundwater. Inevitably at a mine it is necessary to capture and control sediments and other pollutants in surface water, and build and operate the works needed to comply with regulations regarding off-site impact by surface waters running from the mine. Accordingly, this course is intended for all those people at a mine or associated with a mine who may be involved with or responsible for the hydrologic, hydraulic, environmental, civil, and mining engineering works required to manage surface water at a mine. Author Jack Caldwell P.E., MS.(Eng.), LLB   Duration 12 Hours Access 90 Days Category Geotechnics Level Specialize Version Date February 22, 2013 Need to train a team? Whether you're looking for a customized training program or developing a team, we have enterprise solutions to fit your needs. Learn More Read More

Covers are constructed at mines sites over facilities such as tailings impoundments, heap leach pads, waste rock dumps, sludge ponds, and solid waste disposal units. Generally the cover is constructed as part of the closure and/or reclamation works. A wide range of cover types have been designed and constructed on mine facilities worldwide, from water covers, through soil covers, geosynthetic covers, and waste rock covers. The specifics of the cover are dictated by the: type of waste covered; materials available to construct the cover; environment of the mine; and governing regulations. This course is the first in a series of two courses on covers for mine geowaste facilities. Covers for Mine Geowaste Facilities - 1: Principles, Practice, and Selection deals with the general principles and practice of covers—what their purpose is, what objectives govern their selection and detailing, and what to consider when choosing a cover for your specific facility. In this course, we examine the: objectives of mine closure—the activity that most frequently gives rise to the need for a cover; purpose of the cover, and hence the criteria which govern the design, construction, and ultimately the performance of the cover; and layers or components of a cover—some to limit infiltration, some to resist erosion, and some to support vegetation. The course includes numerous case studies from the author's extensive experience. It also includes descriptions of many types of covers that have been used and that could be used at mines. This course is intended for all who seek to know more about covers for mines and their waste management facilities. There is information in this course for those charged with choosing a cover type, designing and constructing the cover, paying for the cover, and for those regulating and permitting a new cover. There is also information in this course for those who may be evaluating and judging a mine's closure plan, which normally includes one or more covers. Topics in include design analyses, performance assessment, cover construction, and surveillance and maintenance. include design analyses, performance assessment, cover construction, and surveillance and maintenance. Authors Jack Caldwell P.E., MS.(Eng.), LLB Duration 12 hours Access 90 Days Category Geotechnics Level Specialize Version Date October 26, 2016   ​Need to train a team? Whether you're looking for a customized training program or developing a team, we have enterprise solutions to fit your needs. Learn More Read More

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