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The development of a resource extraction project instantly changes the environment and social context of the area. Even the smallest group of pre-exploration geologists walking through a community can set off gossip and speculation about potential future economic, political, environmental, social and cultural transformations in a community; construction and operations typically lead to significant long-term change. This is particularly true in remote areas with small, isolated communities, which are often the ones that interact most intimately with resource projects. A strategic social management system can help a company think about its relationship with communities, the extent of the risks posed to their construction or operations and can help a company to assess and manage the social issues, strategies and benefits that are important to the project stakeholders over time. This course provides an introduction to the key components of successful strategic social management. It draws heavily on more than 20 years of experience by the MFC team designing, implementing and assessing social management systems and social performance on some of the largest and some of the most complex (not always large) mining projects around the globe. The course outlines the four distinct social management areas and brings them together into an integrated, risk-based approach for managing social performance. Strategic social management requires holistic thinking, collaboration, clear communication, integrated analysis and reporting; however, meaningful results require a detailed understanding of each of the contributing parts. Authors Monkey Forest Consulting   Duration 26 Hours Access 90 Days Category Leadership Level Introduce Version Date March 27, 2015 Need to train a team? Whether you're looking for a customized training program or developing a team, we have enterprise solutions to fit your needs. Learn More Read More

This course provides current insights and practical suggestions for implementing maintenance management as a viable and valuable asset for any industry seeking to improve its operating systems. Intended as a senior level reference for both maintenance and nonmaintenance professionals alike, Uptime provides an overview of maintenance management. It examines various elements that maintenance managers deal with and offers guidelines for maintenance success, specifically, useful information about "what" works well and "how" to achieve it. Whenever possible, the author has attempted to stay away from excessive details that are likely to be more confusing than illuminating to lay readers; he has tried to balance this by providing enough information to help the dedicated maintenance professional make informed choices. Brief "Summary" sections appear at the end of each session. These outline key points for executives and managers who want to focus on significant points without getting bogged down in minutiae. Authors  James V. Reyes-Picknell    Duration: 18 Hours Access: 90 Days Category: Mining Level: Specialize Version Date: February 25, 2009 Read More

Process mineralogy combines mineralogical techniques with mineral process unit operations to identify minerals, their associations and characteristics in order to... establish feasibility concepts at the early stages of geological exploration; design processing flowsheets; specify raw materials and marketable products; troubleshoot plants; and indicate new uses of minerals. Process Mineralogy 2 for Coal and Industrial Minerals is the second of two courses on process mineralogy by the author. It presents application of the basic tools of investigative and analytical mineralogy with respect to coal and industrial minerals, illustrated by numerous examples, including... coal petrology; industrial minerals: diatomite, clay and calcium carbonate; and industrial minerals: structural clay, glass, cement and advanced ceramics. Together with the companion course, Process Mineralogy 1 for Metals (which also covers the investigative and analytical tools of process mineralogy), this course provides an excellent introduction to process mineralogy for all mining disciplines. Authors Dr. Marcello Veiga   Duration 10 Hours Access 90 Days Category Mineral Processing Level Specialize Version Date April 11, 2005 ​Need to train a team? Whether you're looking for a customized training program or developing a team, we have enterprise solutions to fit your needs. Learn More Read More

This course begins by introducing and critically examining the concepts and theories that underpin the idea of indigeneity. It then discusses some of the most active mining regions of the world, providing key contextual information about Indigenous peoples in common-law countries (Canada, United States, Australia) and Latin American countries (Mexico, Peru, Brazil). It also emphasizes Indigenous experiences with colonization, because these experiences frame the way many Indigenous peoples view mining and development activities today. One of the overarching points we wish to stress at the beginning of this course, and which is reflected throughout, is the incredible diversity of Indigenous peoples—culturally, linguistically, developmentally, and in terms of their aspirations. In some parts of the world, such as the Amazon rainforest, Indigenous peoples might be some of the least advanced civilizations remaining in the world, relying on hunting and gathering to survive and having very little interaction with the outside world. In other parts of the world (such as Canada, the United States, or Australia), Indigenous people actively participate in politics and the community, run businesses, and use modern technology. Indigenous peoples' aspirations vary, too. In some cases, they may aspire to have legal, political, and social space to continue a way of life that they have developed over thousands of years. In other cases, they may aspire to find a way to balance the retention of their cultural uniqueness while also participating in the modern world. The authors of this course are attuned to this fact, even though a survey of contemporary Indigenous peoples' aspirations is not covered in this course. One characteristic that all Indigenous peoples share is a deep connection to their history. Although some people might consider the material we survey in this course to be ancient history, these events and stories form the basis of the relationship between Indigenous and Non-Indigenous peoples. It's important that anyone who might have interactions with Indigenous peoples (particularly in the context of mining) be aware of this. Indigenous Peoples and Mining Series Background The Indigenous Peoples and Mining series was developed to support mining professionals in understanding who Indigenous peoples are, how their rights and interests are recognized in standards and law, and to identify how contemporary mining activities impact Indigenous peoples. All the world's major mining regions are home to Indigenous peoples. As the Indigenous rights movement has gained momentum, the mining sector increasingly finds itself having to navigate challenging issues that arise as a result of exploration and extractive activities on or near Indigenous lands. Exacerbating such engagements is the remarkable speed of these political changes. When most present-day mining professionals were in school, Indigenous rights were not even on the radar. Indeed, even today—speaking especially from a global perspective—Indigenous issues are inadequately covered within the mining schools. To students and practitioners alike, the course series will be of interest to anyone active in mining today. Upon completing the course series, participants will come away with an awareness of how contemporary mining activities fit within a long and dynamic story about Indigenous peoples—their existence, historical subjugation, cultural resiliency, and collective effort to gain recognition as distinct peoples with corresponding rights. Authors Amiel Blajchman Corey Dekker   Duration: 7 Hours Access: 90 Days Category: Environment Level: Introduce Version Date: January 17, 2019 Read More

The work of today has changed significantly from what it was. Organizations have become more complex. Globalization and technology have created both opportunities and new challenges for the employment relationship and how employers and employees relate with one another. This holds true for the mining industry that must also deal with challenges such as volatile commodity markets. While all these challenges can be daunting, the fundamental issues of staffing, orientation, compensation, performance management, etc. remain vital and ongoing factors for organizations to address. In this course, we look at the best practices of sourcing, selecting, and securing employees. This course will be of interest to managers and supervisors who work with recruiters to build their teams. This course will also benefit prospective employees to gain a better understanding of this process. Taking a strategic approach, this course not only focuses on the immediate need to fill a vacancy. It looks at this as the first step in the longer term approach to engage and retain talent. This is achieved by linking the specific HR functions to the achievement of the organization's goals and strategic objectives. Sourcing the right candidates for vacancies used to be a relatively easy process of placing an ad in the newspaper and waiting for the resumes to come in. Both employers and applicants knew where to connect. Today, it can be time consuming and much more difficult as there are a myriad of methods and places for employers to advertise and for employees to look. In this course we outline an approach of planning out the sourcing process to inform potential candidates of the opportunity to generate a sufficiently populated applicant pool of qualified candidates. Once there are sufficient qualified applicants, making a good selection decision is vital. A poor selection decision can have a significant, negative impact on achievement of business goals. Developing a strong understanding of the requirements of the role and using these to screen and then develop interview questions and strategies to inform the selection decision is vital to a successful search. Engagement and retention are increasingly becoming an important goal for organizations. As one of the first steps associated with this, the orientation process starts the employee on the path of becoming a committed and productive employee. Compensation is another area that contributes to engagement and retention. Understanding how compensation is related to the role and that it is fairly established addresses an underlying fundamental issue for employees. Authors Luciano Anjos   Duration 5 Hours Access 90 Days Category Leadership Level Specialize Version Date April, 6 2017 ​Need to train a team? Whether you're looking for a customized training program or developing a team, we have enterprise solutions to fit your needs. Learn More Read More

This introductory course is intended for anybody involved in mining who has to manage, review, pay for, design, construct, operate, or close a geotechnical structure at a mine. Included in the mining-related geotechnical structures you will study in this course are the obvious: tailings impoundments, waste rock dumps, and heap leach pads. Once you have finished this course you will know enough to deal with anything on the mine that is made of soil, rock, and those modern materials called geosynthetics. This course is not intended to make you into a geotechnical engineering specialist. It will introduce you to and provide you with plenty of practical information and knowledge about those aspects of geotechnical engineering that occur at every mine. This includes geotechnical characterization of a site, soil characterization and properties, the design of geotechnical structures, and the construction, operation, and closure of mining facilities made or consisting of soil, rock, and geosynthetics. The following primary aspects of geotechnical engineering are covered for each of the major geowaste structures at a mine: Site Exploration Soil Characterization Soil Performance Design and Construction Operation of Mine Geowaste Facilities Closure of Mine Geowaste Facilities Summary of Geotechnical Factors The course includes numerous case studies from the author's extensive experience. Authors Jack Caldwell P.E., MS.(Eng.), LLB   Duration: 22 Hours Access: 90 days Category: Geotechnics Level: Specialize Version Date: June 23, 2010   ​Need to train a team? Whether you're looking for a customized training program or developing a team, we have enterprise solutions to fit your needs. Learn More Read More

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