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Leaching Processes is the second in a series of four hydrometallurgy courses by the author, written for university students as well as practicing engineers and metallurgists. The Hydrometallurgy series covers the elementary theoretical basis of solution chemistry, the engineering aspects, and the technical applications for a large variety of raw materials, e.g. metals, oxides, sulfides, phosphates, silicates, and others. It also covers the purification-concentration steps such as adsorption on activated charcoal, ion exchange, and solvent extraction. Finally, the general aspects of precipitation from aqueous solutions are covered with numerous examples. The series is characterized by clear and simplified flowsheets, numerous chemical equations written mainly in ionic form, many illustrations for equipment and plants, and finally a lucid style presenting the facts point by point as concisely as possible. Hydrometallurgy 2 - Leaching Processes covers the leaching processes used for hydrometallurgical treatment of mineral ores, concentrates and metals. It covers treatment of the ore types and metals susceptible to hydrometallurgical treatment, from precious metals to oxides, hydroxides, sulfides, phosphates, silicates and others. Authors Fathi Habashi   Duration: 18 Hours Access: 90 Days Category: Mineral Processing Level: Specialize Version Date: May 14, 2008 Need to train a team? Whether you're looking for a customized training program or developing a team, we have enterprise solutions to fit your needs. Learn More Read More

Concentration and Purification of Leach Solutions is the third in a series of four hydrometallurgy courses by the author, written for university students as well as practicing engineers and metallurgists. The Hydrometallurgy series covers the elementary theoretical basis of solution chemistry, the engineering aspects, and the technical applications for a large variety of raw materials, e.g. metals, oxides, sulfides, phosphates, silicates, and others. It also covers the purification-concentration steps such as adsorption on activated charcoal, ion exchange, and solvent extraction. Finally, the general aspects of precipitation from aqueous solutions are covered with numerous examples. The series is characterized by clear and simplified flowsheets, numerous chemical equations written mainly in ionic form, many illustrations for equipment and plants, and finally a lucid style presenting the facts point by point as concisely as possible. Hydrometallurgy 3 - Concentration and Purification of Leach Solutions covers the processes of activated charcoal adsorption, ion exchange and solvent extraction and how they relate to the concentration and purification of leach solutions. Authors Fathi Habashi   Duration: 15 hours Access: 90 Days Category: Mineral Processing Level: Specialize Version Date: June 24, 2008   Need to train a team? Whether you're looking for a customized training program or developing a team, we have enterprise solutions to fit your needs. Learn More Read More

Precipitation of Leach Solutions is the fourth in a series of four hydrometallurgy courses by the author, written for university students as well as practicing engineers and metallurgists. The Hydrometallurgy series covers the elementary theoretical basis of solution chemistry, the engineering aspects, and the technical applications for a large variety of raw materials, e.g. metals, oxides, sulfides, phosphates, silicates, and others. It also covers the purification-concentration steps such as adsorption on activated charcoal, ion exchange, and solvent extraction. Finally, the general aspects of precipitation from aqueous solutions are covered with numerous examples. The series is characterized by clear and simplified flowsheets, numerous chemical equations written mainly in ionic form, many illustrations for equipment and plants, and finally a lucid style presenting the facts point by point as concisely as possible. Hydrometallurgy 4 - Precipitation of Leach Solutions covers physical precipitation, the principles of crystals and crystallization, and engineering aspects and applications. It also covers chemical precipitation and the principles of ionic and hydrolytic precipitation as well as precipitation by reduction. Authors Fathi Habashi   Duration: 15 Hours Access: 90 Days Category: Mineral Processing Level: Specialize Version Date: July 25, 2008   Need to train a team? Whether you're looking for a customized training program or developing a team, we have enterprise solutions to fit your needs. Learn More Read More

Course Details A growing global population and shift to global equality has created a dependence on mining; and yet, external stakeholders continue to challenge the environmental assessment space, engagement processes and requirements, as well as cause increasing stringency in regulatory requirements and management standards for such developments.  Put simply, external stakeholders now want to either be involved in the decision-making process, or to be able to clearly see how impacts to people and planet have been considered and avoided for large developments.  In the Impactful Decision-Making Framework - P5 Impact Analyses course, delegates will learn about the sustainability framework, and how it functions as a means to focus on, identify, and integrate social, environmental and financial considerations into the planning, decision-making and operational strategies of proposed infrastructure and developments.   Using the framework, delegates also gain a means to improve transparency of proposed plans amongst design teams and stakeholders involved in the process.   Dates: April 12, 14, 16, 2021  Duration: 9 hours – 3 hours over 3 days  Time: 7:00am - 10:00 am PST - Check the exact time and date in your city here.  Price: $999 USD See below for course policy  Learning Objectives  At the end of this course you should be able to:  Have a good understanding of mining-relevant 5Ps: People, Planet, Profit, Process & Product,  Have a transparent framework to engage multi-discipline teams in dialogue about 5P issues  Understand how the P5 framework can support high-level performance gap assessments on current projects  Utilize the P5 analysis framework to compare design and process options for any type of project, with multi-discipline, multi-stakeholder teams  Demonstrate how and why a decision was made between project options  Facilitate making sustainability-informed decisions and recommendations – for the best possible outcomes of a project.  Presenter  Karen Chovan  With over 20 years' experience in the mining sector, Karen is the CEO and founder of Enviro Integration Strategies Inc.. Her experience ranges from managing field / construction projects and performing geological and closure-related studies; to acting as an internal sustainability consultant in a corporate environment, and managing organization-wide change.  Over the last two decades, Karen's core responsibilities have included assessment of existing processes and programs; developing responsive action plans to address risks and accountability gaps; leading corporate strategic planning, and embedding sustainability into project design and management systems.  She's a forward thinker and on a mission to engage, empower and enable individuals and teams to make a positive impact on project and development outcomes. She is driven in casting a wide net of influence; educating and informing those who can truly make a difference, and providing the strategies, tools and techniques necessary to achieve this mission.  Course Structure and Delivery  This course will be taught live - virtually, in a group setting over the course of three x 3-hour sessions, with a large proportion of time dedicated to applied and interactive exercises.  The course will be a blend of hands-on and own-project learning, and as such more than half of the class duration will involve active, applied work within the class.  Exercises will include:  Ice-breaker exercises – to help engage the class at the start of each session, and encourage recognition of differing perspectives, knowledge and experiences  Extended breakout discussions – around the 5Ps for a particular case study, to help gain a full appreciation of how these relate to real projects & how we might prioritize aspects  Staged and directed brainstorming – around various options for an example project component, including related risks and requirements, and possible concerns or benefits, utilizing checklists and examples  Extended breakout discussions – to compare and contrast, then rank potential solutions on a case study, taking into account the numerous requirements, pros and cons of each  Presentation and comparison of results from various “teams” in the classroom    Who Should Attend?  This course is ideal for project managers, engineers & assessment professionals who:  have 5 or more years' mining sector experience  desire a justified means to incorporate environmental and social considerations into planning, design and operations of future projects  desire a transparent, communicable method of assessing and comparing design options  Cancellations Notice of cancellation must be given in writing by letter, fax or email and action will be taken to recover, from the delegates or their employers, that portion of the fee owing at the time of cancellation.  A 10% administration fee will be levied for cancellations made 4 or more weeks prior to the first day of the course. Thereafter, the following cancellation refund schedule will apply.  Cancellation made more than 3 weeks prior to the first day of the short course: 70% of the registration fee is reimbursed.  Cancellation made more than 2 weeks prior to the first day of the short course: 50% of the registration fee is reimbursed.  Cancellation made less than 2 weeks prior to the first day of the short course: no reimbursement of registration fees.  Edumine reserves the right to cancel an advertised course on short notice. It will endeavour to provide participants with as much notice as possible but will not accept liability for costs incurred by participants or their organizations as a result of the course being cancelled or postponed.  Read More

This course begins by introducing and critically examining the concepts and theories that underpin the idea of indigeneity. It then discusses some of the most active mining regions of the world, providing key contextual information about Indigenous peoples in common-law countries (Canada, United States, Australia) and Latin American countries (Mexico, Peru, Brazil). It also emphasizes Indigenous experiences with colonization, because these experiences frame the way many Indigenous peoples view mining and development activities today. One of the overarching points we wish to stress at the beginning of this course, and which is reflected throughout, is the incredible diversity of Indigenous peoples—culturally, linguistically, developmentally, and in terms of their aspirations. In some parts of the world, such as the Amazon rainforest, Indigenous peoples might be some of the least advanced civilizations remaining in the world, relying on hunting and gathering to survive and having very little interaction with the outside world. In other parts of the world (such as Canada, the United States, or Australia), Indigenous people actively participate in politics and the community, run businesses, and use modern technology. Indigenous peoples' aspirations vary, too. In some cases, they may aspire to have legal, political, and social space to continue a way of life that they have developed over thousands of years. In other cases, they may aspire to find a way to balance the retention of their cultural uniqueness while also participating in the modern world. The authors of this course are attuned to this fact, even though a survey of contemporary Indigenous peoples' aspirations is not covered in this course. One characteristic that all Indigenous peoples share is a deep connection to their history. Although some people might consider the material we survey in this course to be ancient history, these events and stories form the basis of the relationship between Indigenous and Non-Indigenous peoples. It's important that anyone who might have interactions with Indigenous peoples (particularly in the context of mining) be aware of this. Indigenous Peoples and Mining Series Background The Indigenous Peoples and Mining series was developed to support mining professionals in understanding who Indigenous peoples are, how their rights and interests are recognized in standards and law, and to identify how contemporary mining activities impact Indigenous peoples. All the world's major mining regions are home to Indigenous peoples. As the Indigenous rights movement has gained momentum, the mining sector increasingly finds itself having to navigate challenging issues that arise as a result of exploration and extractive activities on or near Indigenous lands. Exacerbating such engagements is the remarkable speed of these political changes. When most present-day mining professionals were in school, Indigenous rights were not even on the radar. Indeed, even today—speaking especially from a global perspective—Indigenous issues are inadequately covered within the mining schools. To students and practitioners alike, the course series will be of interest to anyone active in mining today. Upon completing the course series, participants will come away with an awareness of how contemporary mining activities fit within a long and dynamic story about Indigenous peoples—their existence, historical subjugation, cultural resiliency, and collective effort to gain recognition as distinct peoples with corresponding rights. Authors Amiel Blajchman Corey Dekker   Duration: 7 Hours Access: 90 Days Category: Environment Level: Introduce Version Date: January 17, 2019 Read More

This course identifies some of the intersection points between mining activities and Indigenous peoples. The course is organized according to the mining life cycle, from mineral exploration through mine development, operations, and ultimately mine closure/reclamation and post-closure. We survey some key activities that take place at each phase of the mining life cycle and identify ways in which these activities could both affect and benefit Indigenous peoples. This course also showcases some practical tools and examples for mining practitioners who work with Indigenous peoples. A significant amount of publicly available information describes the experiences that mining proponents have had in Indigenous engagement (both good and bad) and the course provides an introduction to that material. This course continues on from the companion course, "Indigenous Peoples and Mining 1: Indigeneity Concepts and Context," which examines the complex idea of indigeneity in several active mining regions in the world (Canada, the United States, Australia, Mexico, Peru, and Brazil). An overarching point we wish to stress in both courses is the incredible diversity of Indigenous peoples—culturally, linguistically, developmentally, and in terms of their aspirations. Indigenous Peoples and Mining Series Background The Indigenous Peoples and Mining series was developed to support mining professionals in understanding who Indigenous peoples are, how their rights and interests are recognized in standards and law, and to identify how contemporary mining activities impact Indigenous peoples. All the world's major mining regions are home to Indigenous peoples. As the Indigenous rights movement has gained momentum, the mining sector increasingly finds itself having to navigate challenging issues that arise as a result of exploration and extractive activities on or near Indigenous lands. Exacerbating such engagements is the remarkable speed of these political changes. When most present-day mining professionals were in school, Indigenous rights were not even on the radar. Indeed, even today—speaking especially from a global perspective—Indigenous issues are inadequately covered within the mining schools. To students and practitioners alike, the course series will be of interest to anyone active in mining today. Upon completing the course series, participants will come away with an awareness of how contemporary mining activities fit within a long and dynamic story about Indigenous peoples—their existence, historical subjugation, cultural resiliency, and collective effort to gain recognition as distinct peoples with corresponding rights. Authors Amiel Blajchman Corey Dekker   Duration: 5 Hours Access: 90 Days Category: Environment Level: Introduce Version Date: January 17, 2019   ​Need to train a team? Whether you're looking for a customized training program or developing a team, we have enterprise solutions to fit your needs. Learn More Read More

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