ADVANCE YOUR CAREER

Edumine is the world's leading provider of training and education to the mining industry. We offer individuals, corporations and educators effective solutions.

About Us

Upcoming Sessions

See All Upcoming Sessions

The cyanidation process for the extraction of gold and silver from ore has been employed since 1898 when it was first used in New Zealand and Africa and soon after in the United States. It is a very efficient process capable of extracting gold in amounts of less than one percent of an ounce from a ton of rock with over 90% efficiency. Because of the environmental risks, a cyanide management plan is of critical importance to a mining operation. The lack of such a plan, in some cases, has contributed to adverse environmental incidents involving cyanide. The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) is developing an international code for the management of cyanide. Implementation and adherence to this code, augmented by experienced scientific and engineering judgment, will help reduce both the number and severity of environmental incidents involving cyanide. The "Cyanide Management in Mining" courses attempt to provide the user with the necessary background for development of a cyanide management plan that meets the unique requirements of each operating mine. The full complement of courses in the series includes: Chemistry of Free and Complexed Cyanide Analysis of Cyanides Geochemical Properties and Environmental Fate of Cyanide Toxicity and Environmental Properties of Cyanide Water Management and Discharge Strategies Treatment Technologies for Cyanide and Related Compounds "Geochemical Properties and Environmental Fate of Cyanide" is the third in the series of six courses. This course covers the attenuation mechanisms applicable to cyanide and their effectiveness in different metallurgical and environmental contexts, including surface ponds, tailings, heap leach, soil and groundwater. This course comprises 12 viewing sessions, each of 30 - 60 minutes duration, plus supporting figures, tables and references, and three interactive reviews that confirm achievement of the learning objectives. Authors Dr. Terry Mudder   Duration 10 Hours Access 90 Days Category Environmental Level Specialize Published August 3, 2006 Updated October 13, 2021   ​Need to train a team? Whether you're looking for a customized training program or developing a team, we have enterprise solutions to fit your needs. Learn More Read More

The cyanidation process for the extraction of gold and silver from ore has been employed since 1898 when it was first used in New Zealand and Africa and soon after in the United States. It is a very efficient process capable of extracting gold in amounts of less than one percent of an ounce from a ton of rock with over 90% efficiency. Because of the environmental risks, a cyanide management plan is of critical importance to a mining operation. The lack of such a plan, in some cases, has contributed to adverse environmental incidents involving cyanide. The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) is developing an international code for the management of cyanide. Implementation and adherence to this code, augmented by experienced scientific and engineering judgment, will help reduce both the number and severity of environmental incidents involving cyanide. The "Cyanide Management in Mining" courses attempt to provide the user with the necessary background for development of a cyanide management plan that meets the unique requirements of each operating mine. The full complement of courses in the series includes: Chemistry of Free and Complexed Cyanide Analysis of Cyanides Geochemical Properties and Environmental Fate of Cyanide Toxicity and Environmental Properties of Cyanide Water Management and Discharge Strategies Treatment Technologies for Cyanide and Related Compounds "Analysis of Cyanides" is the second in the series of six courses. This course covers the methods available for measurement and analysis of different categories of cyanide, and discusses the advantages, disadvantages and problems associated with them. It also covers sources of analytical interference in cyanide analysis, variability and accuracy, and measurement of low levels of cyanide in the environment. This course comprises 10 viewing sessions, each of 30 - 60 minutes duration, plus supporting figures, tables and references, and two interactive reviews that confirm achievement of the learning objectives Authors Dr. Terry Mudder Duration 8 Hours Access 90 Days Category Environment Level Specialize Published July 10, 2006 Updated July 23, 2021 ​Need to train a team? Whether you're looking for a customized training program or developing a team, we have enterprise solutions to fit your needs. Learn More Read More

This is the first course in the six-course Cyanide Management in Mining series. This course assumes knowledge of environmental engineering or mineral processing. The chemistry of cyanide solutions is unique with its ability to dissolve gold and silver. Cyanide is highly selective with respect to combining with gold and silver; in solution it forms complexes with other metals, such as mercury, zinc, copper, iron, and nickel. The formation of these other metal complexes partially account for the consumption of cyanide in gold extraction circuits and generate solutions that can be difficult to treat and analyze. Although chemical replacements for cyanide have been investigated for decades, it remains the exclusive extraction reagent or lixiviant of choice for over 90% of the gold recovered. This is due to a combination of availability, effectiveness, economics, and an ability to use and manage cyanide with acceptable risk to humans and the environment. Cyanide Management in Mining Series The Cyanide Management in Mining course series provides the learner with the necessary background for developing a cyanide management plan that meets the unique requirements of each operating mine. Due to environmental risks, a cyanide management plan is of critical importance to a mining operation. The lack of such a plan, in some cases, has contributed to adverse environmental incidents involving cyanide. The series consists of the following courses. Chemistry of Free and Complexed Cyanide Analysis of Cyanides Geochemical Properties and Environmental Fate of Cyanide Toxicity and Environmental Properties of Cyanide Water Management and Discharge Strategies Treatment Technologies for Cyanide and Related Compounds Authors Dr. Terry Mudder Duration 3 Hours Access 90 Days Category Environment Level Specialize Published: August 17, 2018 Updated: July 19, 2021 ​Need to train a team? Whether you're looking for a customized training program or developing a team, we have enterprise solutions to fit your needs. Learn More Read More

Covers are constructed at mines sites over facilities such as tailings impoundments, heap leach pads, waste rock dumps, sludge ponds, and solid waste disposal units. Generally the cover is constructed as part of the closure and/or reclamation works. This course is the second in a series of two courses on covers for mine geowaste facilities. In this course, we examine the design and performance assessment of covers, which includes: engineering, scientific, and technical design methods to calculate and quantify just how the cover may perform in regards to stability, infiltration, erosion, and deformation; and the construction, surveillance, and monitoring that will need to be undertaken to put and keep the cover in operation. The course includes numerous case studies from the author's extensive experience. This course is intended for all who seek to know more about covers for mines and their waste management facilities. There is information in this course for those charged with choosing a cover type, designing and constructing the cover, paying for the cover, and for those regulating and permitting a new cover. There is also information in this course for those who may be evaluating and judging a mine's closure plan, which normally includes one or more covers. Authors Jack Caldwell P.E., MS.(Eng.), LLB Duration 10 hours Access 90 Days Category Geotechnics Level Specialize Version Date October 20, 2016   ​Need to train a team? Whether you're looking for a customized training program or developing a team, we have enterprise solutions to fit your needs. Learn More Read More

This course covers set-up of a numerical model, model calibration and verification, modelling predictions, and evaluation of model uncertainty. Duration: 7 Hours Access: 90 Days Category: Geotechnics Level: Specialize   ​Need to train a team? Whether you're looking for a customized training program or developing a team, we have enterprise solutions to fit your needs. Learn More   Authors Christoph Wels Dan Mackie Jacek Scibek Lawrence Charlebois Paul Ferguson Introduction The scale and nature of mining projects may result in impacts to the receiving environment, including groundwater resources. These impacts need to be quantified before undertaking the project and throughout the mining lifecycle to ensure regulatory compliance, project sustainability, and environmental protection. Common groundwater impacts associated with mining projects may include: aquifer drawdown and/or reduction in groundwater flow due to pumping from groundwater production wells and/or dewatering of open pit/underground workings;loss of groundwater discharge to surface water such as springs, lakes or streams (of particular significance during winter baseflow conditions) due to aquifer drawdown/dewatering related to mining activities;seepage and associated contaminant transport from mine waste units such as waste rock piles, heap leach piles, tailings storage facilities, backfilled and/or flooded pits/underground workings; andoff-site migration of contaminant plumes in groundwater aquifers (originating from mine waste units) and potential discharge of contaminants into the receiving surface water (springs, lakes or streams). The use of numerical groundwater models enables decision makers to study and evaluate potential impacts of large and complex mining projects. Sophisticated models and modelling platforms are, however, no guarantee of good modelling practice. The complexities of groundwater models used for impact assessment may even lead to misuse and/or misinterpretation. This series of two courses on groundwater modelling describes the broader concepts of groundwater modelling related to impact assessment for mining projects. Yet, these guidelines reflect generally accepted best practices in groundwater modelling and as such should be applicable to a wide range of groundwater modelling applications. This groundwater modeling series is based on the British Columbia Groundwater Modelling Guidelines which were commissioned by the British Columbia Ministry of Environment (BC MoE). This course has been modified and condensed to suit the format and (international) audience of an Edumine course. The course comprises ten learning sessions of 30 to 60 minutes each, several case studies, and interactive reviews that confirm achievement of the learning objectives. The total duration of the course is approximately seven hours. Read More

Reclamation and Revegetation for Mines in Arid Climates is intended for environmental specialists in private practice and governmental agencies. The purpose of this course is to present mining related reclamation based on practical and actual experience. The course presents actual mine reclamation practices that worked or didn’t work. The focus of this course is on base and precious metal mining operations in the western US, but the reclamation practices are applicable in other regions of the US and abroad. The course presents all aspects related to reclamation of mines from the initial baseline studies to final reclamation and bond release. Much of the approach is based on requirements by governmental agency rules and regulations. Reclamation programs are based on site specific conditions and baseline studies. These studies and surveys may start by examining natural revegetation in the region and on old mine disturbance. The goal is to create systems based on ecosystem analysis (prior knowledge) and sound ecological processes and patterns. The ecosystems established will be stable and sustainable based on the environmental settings, since local ecosystems are a function of climate, soils, biota; animals/vegetation, time, cycles, and energy flow. The goal is to match current ecosystems and promote diversity in compatibility with the surrounding landscape. Authors Dr. Sam Bamberg   Duration 12 Hours Access 90 Days Category Environment Level Specialize Version Date March 13, 2013 ​Need to train a team? Whether you're looking for a customized training program or developing a team, we have enterprise solutions to fit your needs. Learn More Read More

Shopping Cart

Your cart is empty