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Probability graphs display a data set as a cumulative distribution. The most significant use of probability graphs applied to mineral exploration data is in the recognition of the number of populations in a data set, and the partial or complete partitioning of individual values into their respective groups or populations. The significance of the resulting groupings or populations of data must be interpreted. Interpreting probability graphs is largely a matter of understanding the implications of the patterns that result when data sets are plotted. These implications are not always fully appreciated, and in some cases, the conclusions drawn from the probability graphs are incorrect. In this course, you will learn how probability graphs can supplement analyses done using histograms, and how this can be beneficial when interpreting mineral exploration data. The course explains data distributions and populations. You will learn that probability graphs are an easy way to estimate the forms of distributions and their parameters. They are a useful tool to present and analyze many types of numeric data that are the product of mineral exploration programs. The course also highlights general advantages, but also limitations of using probability graphs, and provides useful procedure tips to draw up the graphs. Note that this course assumes a working knowledge of simple statistical concepts (e.g. arithmetic mean, variance, standard deviation, normal density distribution, etc.). The course content uses a clear-cut, idealized approach illustrated by real life practical examples used throughout the mining industry. The Appendix includes a variety of interpretations of published probability graphs with alternate interpretations and discussion on the analytical approaches used by the original publications. Authors Alastair J. Sinclair   Duration 16 Hours Access 90 Days Category Exploration Level Specialize Version Date December 3, 2018 ​Need to train a team? Whether you're looking for a customized training program or developing a team, we have enterprise solutions to fit your needs. Learn More Read More

Process mineralogy combines mineralogical techniques with mineral process unit operations to identify minerals, their associations and characteristics in order to... establish feasibility concepts at the early stages of geological exploration; design processing flowsheets; specify raw materials and marketable products; troubleshoot plants; indicate new uses of minerals. Process Mineralogy 1 for Metals presents the basic tools of process mineralogy and their application primarily with respect to metals, illustrated by numerous examples. Topics covered include the following. Importance of process mineralogy for mining, mineral processing and metallurgy; definition of raw materials; different sources of raw materials; techniques used in process mineralogy; important mineralogical aspects for mineral concentration and leaching. Analytical techniques used in process mineralogy to identify and quantify minerals and for chemical analysis; principles of optical microscopy; use of the polarizing microscope to identify minerals; transmitted and reflected light. Quantitative mineralogical analysis using optical microscopy; point counting; degree of liberation by the Gaudin method; image analysis. Mineralogical analysis by x-ray diffraction; principles of x-ray generation and diffraction; quantitative XRD methods; use of x-ray fluorescence for chemical analysis. Electron microscopy; scanned and transmitted beams; interaction of electrons with matter; x-ray maps; identification of minerals. Quantitative mineralogical analysis using mineral separation; heavy liquid separation; density gradient; study of mineral liberation using heavy liquids and flotation; study of gold liberation. Quantitative mineralogical analysis based on chemical composition of minerals; mass balance techniques. Application of process mineralogy to coal and industrial minerals is covered in a companion course titled Process Mineralogy 2 for Coal and Industrial Minerals. Authors Dr. Marcello Veiga   Duration: 20 Hours Access: 90 Days Category: Mineral Processing Level: Specialize Version Date: January 21, 2005 ​Need to train a team? Whether you're looking for a customized training program or developing a team, we have enterprise solutions to fit your needs. Learn More   Read More

Process mineralogy combines mineralogical techniques with mineral process unit operations to identify minerals, their associations and characteristics in order to... establish feasibility concepts at the early stages of geological exploration; design processing flowsheets; specify raw materials and marketable products; troubleshoot plants; and indicate new uses of minerals. Process Mineralogy 2 for Coal and Industrial Minerals is the second of two courses on process mineralogy by the author. It presents application of the basic tools of investigative and analytical mineralogy with respect to coal and industrial minerals, illustrated by numerous examples, including... coal petrology; industrial minerals: diatomite, clay and calcium carbonate; and industrial minerals: structural clay, glass, cement and advanced ceramics. Together with the companion course, Process Mineralogy 1 for Metals (which also covers the investigative and analytical tools of process mineralogy), this course provides an excellent introduction to process mineralogy for all mining disciplines. Authors Dr. Marcello Veiga   Duration 10 Hours Access 90 Days Category Mineral Processing Level Specialize Version Date April 11, 2005 ​Need to train a team? Whether you're looking for a customized training program or developing a team, we have enterprise solutions to fit your needs. Learn More Read More

In recent years there has been a strong international move toward knowing and improving the quality of information used in the mining industry for mineral project exploration reporting and resource/reserve estimation. In Canada this trend has been accentuated because of recent, highly publicized scams that involved contamination of samples. An important aim of quality control procedures is to minimize the likelihood of such scams so that the public is not misled as to the economic potential of a mineral deposit. Quality control procedures also serve the technical purposes of identifying sources of and quantifying both random errors and unintentional bias in sampling, subsampling and analytical routines and thus provide the basis for improved procedures of data collection that translate into improved resource/reserve estimates. One of the important reactions in Canada to recent mining scams has been the implementation of what is known as National Instrument 43-101 (NI43-101) in which a wide range of requirements, relating to mineral project reporting and resource/reserve estimation, are laid out. These requirements identify a Qualified Person (QP) who is responsible for all technical matters related to obtaining and publicizing both assay data and resource/reserve figures. This course incorporates a variety of procedures designed to fulfill the requirements of NI43-101 insofar as standard, blank and duplicate samples can be used to define and monitor quality of geochemical and assay values that are the basis of deposit evaluation. The International Standards Organization (ISO) has developed a variety of widely distributed publications dealing with quality control systems for a wide range of industrial settings. The application of the ISO standards to resource/reserve estimation procedures necessarily involves all steps of the published procedures. Too often quality control is thought of only in terms of quantitative measurements. A broader perspective is essential and must include the categorical and qualitative data that are inherent in geological studies. This is a premium course which has been peer-reviewed by a committee appointed by the Canadian Institute of Mining, Metallurgy and Petroleum (CIM) and the Society for Mining, Metallurgy and Exploration (SME). Authors Alastair J. Sinclair   Duration: 25 Hours Access: 90 Days Category: Exploration Level: Cross Train Version Date: June 3, 2015 Need to train a team? Whether you're looking for a customized training program or developing a team, we have enterprise solutions to fit your needs. Learn More Read More

Traditional mining project appraisal—discounted cash flow (DCF)—typically involves the use of static variables that remain unchanged across project life and the use of a constant discount rate to account for risk, which ultimately provides a singular view of project value across time. Such a passive management approach is fast becoming outdated. Modern project appraisal should be dynamic and flexible to accommodate changing market conditions by constantly evaluating options to abandon, defer, open or expand a project while managing risk. This course introduces and explores modern project appraisal techniques with a view to increasing expected value. Scope This course focuses on the use of modern project appraisal techniques culminating in the introduction of real option valuation (ROV) applied to mining projects. While traditional project appraisal concepts form the basis for the modern approach discussed, the in-depth use of these remain beyond the scope of this course. It is recommended that participants complete the Introductory Mining Project Evaluationcourse (see Related Courses tab) for a full account and discussion of traditional project appraisal concepts. Authors Dr. Micah Nehring Ph.D. Dr. Sean Shafiee Ph.D.   Duration 17 Hours Access 90 Days Category Financial Level Specialize Version Date June 29, 2016 ​Need to train a team? Whether you're looking for a customized training program or developing a team, we have enterprise solutions to fit your needs. Learn More Read More

Reclamation and Revegetation for Mines in Arid Climates is intended for environmental specialists in private practice and governmental agencies. The purpose of this course is to present mining related reclamation based on practical and actual experience. The course presents actual mine reclamation practices that worked or didn’t work. The focus of this course is on base and precious metal mining operations in the western US, but the reclamation practices are applicable in other regions of the US and abroad. The course presents all aspects related to reclamation of mines from the initial baseline studies to final reclamation and bond release. Much of the approach is based on requirements by governmental agency rules and regulations. Reclamation programs are based on site specific conditions and baseline studies. These studies and surveys may start by examining natural revegetation in the region and on old mine disturbance. The goal is to create systems based on ecosystem analysis (prior knowledge) and sound ecological processes and patterns. The ecosystems established will be stable and sustainable based on the environmental settings, since local ecosystems are a function of climate, soils, biota; animals/vegetation, time, cycles, and energy flow. The goal is to match current ecosystems and promote diversity in compatibility with the surrounding landscape. Authors Dr. Sam Bamberg   Duration 12 Hours Access 90 Days Category Environment Level Specialize Version Date March 13, 2013 ​Need to train a team? Whether you're looking for a customized training program or developing a team, we have enterprise solutions to fit your needs. Learn More Read More

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